I had my father get sick when I was 22. And I was poor, alright. And my father had an ulcer, and it exploded and you know all these toxins get in your blood. And basically, my father died, whatever, 50 days after his ulcer. So I had a father get sick while I was poor.

My mother got sick when I was rich. And my mother, you know… I don’t really want to get into it, but my mother was sicker than my father. And my mother’s alive. My mother’s fine, OK? I remember going to the hospital to see my mother and wondering, ‘Was I in the right place?’ Like, this was a hotel. Like it had a concierge, man.

People don’t… if the average person really knew the discrepancy in the health care system, there’d be riots in the streets, OK? They would burn this motherfucker down!”

Chris Rock [video]

(via someonestruth)

(Source: umbrellaeon, via ayearofgaming)

If you have any kind of narcissistic tendencies, and I think all creative people do to a certain extent—before these outlets, if you wanted to be in front of somebody, you had to go out into the world and share the thing you made and kind of get off on the adoration of a crowd. But now that crowd exists in your pocket. Whenever you’re feeling like you need that validation from people who already think you’re great, you can just go online and people are like, “You’re amazing!”

It’s cut out the need for people to actually be out in the world sharing their creativity with a crowd, because the crowd is already there. If I can just go on my phone and make witty observations while I’m watching the Emmys, I don’t really need to finish that song that I was working on, because I already did some creative things today. I don’t think it’s a conscious thing, but it’s definitely affecting people. I’ve seen it too many times.

You know, I want to see more girl gamers, right? I want to see more gay gamers coming out the closet. I want to see more black gamers, you know? There just isn’t—It’s not a truly represent demographic of society yet. But we are getting there. And I think that’s gonna be the next phase. Like, as it gets more readily accepted and we drive out that almost, like, negative hardcore element… We’re going to get this beautiful almost, sort of—it’s gonna transcend all the barriers and bullshit in society and gaming’s gonna become the super cool thing to do, I think.

Give a moment or two to the angry young man
With his foot in his mouth and his heart in his hand
He’s been stabbed in the back he’s been misunderstood
It’s a comfort to know his intentions are good
And he sits in his room with a lock on the door
With his maps and his medals laid out on the floor
And he likes to be known as the angry young man

And there’s always a place for the angry young man
With his fist in the air and his head in the sand
And he’s never been able to learn from mistakes
So he can’t understand why his heart always breaks
And his honor is pure and his courage is well
And he’s fair and he’s true and he’s boring as hell
And he’ll go to the grave as an angry old man

(Source: conniecann, via spaceystuff)

Realfield > Garfield Minus Garfield

Realfield > Garfield Minus Garfield

(Source: dohne)

Weakness. 

Weakness. 

(Source: crimesagainsthughsmanatees)

nateswinehart:

Being good to each other is so important, guys.

Some press for Die Noobs from my hometown paper.

“Die Noobs” asks the question of whether two avid video-game players have what it takes to compete at the highest level of e-sports, following the journey of Below and his friend, Jason Rubek of Huntington Beach, Calif., as they chase that particular dream. As cameras document Below and Rubek’s journey, the documentary delves into greater themes of friendship, connections, self-improvement and resilience. And it’s all done with a self-confident, hustling, sometimes profane flair that anyone who knows Below will recognize.
The story spins around the friendship of Below and Rubek. The two met playing video games before they were teenagers, and they developed an online friendship that lasted for years.
“We didn’t just game out, we bonded,” Below said, describing his friendship with Rubek in an early scene of “Die Noobs

Read the whole thing here.  
Watch the premiere with us at twitch.tv/twitch on Friday at 9:00 PM EDT. 

Some press for Die Noobs from my hometown paper.

“Die Noobs” asks the question of whether two avid video-game players have what it takes to compete at the highest level of e-sports, following the journey of Below and his friend, Jason Rubek of Huntington Beach, Calif., as they chase that particular dream. As cameras document Below and Rubek’s journey, the documentary delves into greater themes of friendship, connections, self-improvement and resilience. And it’s all done with a self-confident, hustling, sometimes profane flair that anyone who knows Below will recognize.

The story spins around the friendship of Below and Rubek. The two met playing video games before they were teenagers, and they developed an online friendship that lasted for years.

“We didn’t just game out, we bonded,” Below said, describing his friendship with Rubek in an early scene of “Die Noobs

Read the whole thing here.  

Watch the premiere with us at twitch.tv/twitch on Friday at 9:00 PM EDT